Quantcast

HOW-TO
Collard Greens & Peaches for Breakfast

Lookin' to spice up your egg scramble? Don't know what to do with those tough collard greens? Satisfy your need for green and sweet tooth at the same time with this hearty recipe!

You will need:
  • beaten eggs or egg whites (however many you fancy)
  • chopped collard greens
  • diced zucchini (about 1/3)
  • diced Bosc pear (half)
  • diced peach
  • finely diced onion
  • fresh lime zest
  • freshly grated ginger
  • dried marjoram (or oregano)
  • black ground pepper
RESTAURANT 101
Chef Eddie Huang's Poor Pop-Up Dinner (and How I Made Him Angry)
Now you see 'em, now you don't. The phenomeno n of the pop-up restaurant is ubiquitous in New York City: a temporary space exhibiting the cuisines of selected chefs, sometimes local, sometimes from abroad, via a fixed menu. If successful, it is a tease leaving you wanting more. If the converse it true, then you are thankful that it will disappear. The latter was unfortunately the case with my experience at LTO (Limited Time Only) promoting NYC chef Eddie Huang of restaurants Xiao Ye and Baohaus (a Taiwanese bun shop in the Lower East Side of Manhattan) for a week. If this menu was a showcase of his best work, then perhaps he should stick to making buns. That was the first item to be served, and if I had to choose from the selection of disappointing dishes, the fried oyster bun was probably the least so. Served in a soft bun schmeared with liver pate and stuffed with pickled radishes, it was good. Though the oyster didn't need to be breaded and fried, with a nice flavor and consistency on its own. The same was true for the fried gator tail. The soggy breading concealed the particular flavor of the gator instead of enhancing it. Perhaps this was intentional as this meat was rather chewy, akin to sweetbreads, and n ot everyone is a fan of that texture. With a kick of spice, the gator could have held promise if prepared differently. The pool of sour cream it sat in did not impart any flavor either.
CULINARY OCCASSIONS
The Inside Look at Omnivore Chefs' Master Class

In conjunction with its annual three days of pop-up dinners this weekend June 9th - 11th, the French-based project Omnivore Food Festival World Tour offered a master class of behind the scenes chef demonstrations to a select few of food insiders. Lucky for you, this insider has the scoop on what these young, forward-thinking chefs are creating for this pop-up celebration of food nouveau.

For this third year of dinners in NYC, held at participant Chef John Fraser's Dovetail restaurant on the Upper West Side, American and European chefs are paired - one local and one from abroad - to create a blended but diverse menu, showcasing their respective styles. The chefs are coupled as follows: