BEHIND THE FABRIC
I Am Still Arriving: Albino Riganello

With his recent rise as VP of Design for a top fashion line, Albino Riganello took some time out of his busy schedule to share with me a little about himself, his jewelry collection 1974, and his current views on fashion.


When did you discover your passion for fashion? I was six years old and liked to sketch clothes. I realized that’s what I wanted to do as a career. I didn’t draw landscapes like most children, I found myself drawing clothes.

Who was your earliest mentor and what would you say was the best advice he or she gave you? Domenico Dolce was my first mentor. His best advice to me was “I pay you to dream. When you stop dreaming, you’re fired!”

FASHION
Designer Profile: Sandra Backlund

Originally from Umea in the North of Sweden, designer Sandra Backlund now lives in Stockholm after attending Beckmans College of Design in Stockholm. She learned how to knit from her grandmother when she was a child. She has since turned that skill into an art form all her own. She starts every design with the human body, and from there she thinks of ways in which she can highlight, distort and transform the body’s natural silhouette with clothing. Her approach to her garments has a more sculptural root in that everything stems from a few basic bricks that are then multiplied and attached to one another in order to achieve the desired shape.

CLOTHING
Poppy: The Ultimate Girlie Store in NoLita
DESIGNER PROFILE
Roland Mouret

Parisian designer Roland Mouret began his career in 1979 after leaving Parisian Fashion College. He is most noted for his attention to detail, extraterrestrial inspiration, and overall awareness of the sensuality of the woman’s body. His is described as being “fascinated by nuance” paying very close attention to every single detail in his garments. The galaxy dress, featured in his Spring 2006 collection is one of his staple pieces and has been worn by many celebrities and has even been commented on in Vogue Magazine. Due to business complications, Mouret took a two year break from fashion, only to come back full force with his newly renamed label RM. His Fall 2009 collection features masterfully constructed architectural garments paired with a single shoe featured throughout the show. The general color palette is of the shades of gray, black and navy blue.

DESIGNER PROFILE
Designer Profile: Gareth Pugh

Gareth Pugh’s road to the runway hasn’t been an easy one. A native of England, Pugh began his fashion career at the tender age of 14, working as a costume designer for the English National Youth Theatre. He earned a fashion design degree from Central Saint Martins College of Art & Design in 2003 and has since moved to Paris to move his line forward. But before moving to Paris, Pugh worked out of a warehouse and was soon evicted. Hard work paid off when he won the ANDAM prize, which included a fiscal prize of 150,000 euro. The money allowed Pugh to show his RTW Spring 2009 collection in Paris.

CDFA
Designer Profile: Tim Hamilton
DESIGNER PROFILE
Hussein Chalayan thinks Outside The Box

The fast pace at which today’s society moves leaves little opportunity to stop and check the direction of its course, and this recklessness can result in destruction. Using the analogy of a high speed car crash, British/Turkish Cypriot designer Hussein Chalayan’s Spring 2009 collection uses the medium of fashion to enter into a discussion on this very topic.

Always one to think outside the box, Chalayan is known for his innovative use of materials and open-mindedness toward new technological developments. His latest collection, which debuted in Paris this fall, decided to focus on a car crash to send his message. Molded latex in futuristic silhouettes appeared to be stuck in high speed motion. Models’ hair was tightly pulled back into an aerodynamic looking helmet, and the garments were hand painted with images of photos taken from car graves. These conceptual elements found balance among youthful tee shirt dresses and chic minis, eluding a collection of theatrics in which the clothes get lost. Instead, the concept and garments worked in harmony to create a collection of statement-making garments.