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Could This Be the New Way To Enjoy Ice Cream?
Science has hijacked Popsicle, and made it functional as well as cool.

 

Have you ever been in the middle of watching your favorite sci-fi show and got a hankering for a frozen treat?  When you pulled it out of the freezer, did you ever think, "This isn't nerdy enough.  I want a dessert that's as futuristic and scientifically plausible as the show I'm watching."  We're here to tell you the wait is over: there are now Kyl21 popsicles.  The world's first molecular popsicle  has just been released from food designer David Marx.  Complete with a design that looks like it came straight from the set of Battlestar Galactica, each popsicle has increased surface area and multiple facets--just like the surface of a cut precious stone.  There is nothing traditional about this popsicle: the flavors are stamped in a format similar to the periodic table on a popsicle stick that is slanted at a sharp angle.  David Marx collaborated on the idea of a mathematical shape with a three-star Michelin chef, and a manufacturer of liquid nitrogen equipment.  It seems that liquid nitrogen was the key component of making sure the design held together: in order to prevent the liquid from expanding when it froze and ruining the design, an instantaneous method of freezing had to be used, hence the liquid nitrogen.

This kind of vegan ice cream popsicle is the brainchild of The Science Kitchen, a hybrid of a kitchen and laboratory devoted to using scientific techniques on vegan ingredients.  The result is enjoying food on a completely conceptual level, free from the constraints that traditional cuisine sometimes imposes on dining experience.  Marx and his team are innovators of his field--they are committed to both reimagining and rebranding food, to recreate the exctiement and wonder at experiencing food not as part of a routine but as a piece of art and science.  We don't know how these popsicles taste (and we're skeptical of vegan ice cream), but the design is appealing and the coloring pops.  It'll take some time and crowdfunding to get the popsicles widely distributed, but when they are, we're sure they'll be a hit with the sci-fi crowd.  They look like something Spock designed in his spare time.